Timberwoof
Motorcycle
FAQ

Home
Choosing
Riding
Maintaining
Training
Gear
Cages
Passengers
Laws
Jargon
Books
Links
About
Contact

Snell Labs
Motorcycle Types
Engine Types
Horsepower and Torque
Why wear a helmet?
Decreasing-Radius Turns
Headlight Modulator Law
Riding in Europe
25kW (34HP) Motorcycles
Chicken Strips
Timberwoof's Motorcycle FAQ
Motorcycle Rider Training
Google
 
Web www.timberwoof.com

Amazon

Amazon

Amazon

Riding a bike can’t be that difficult. Why do I need special training?
Riding a motorcycle is not simple; it requires you to pay a lot of attention and to apply a few counterintuitive techniques. In recent months there have been lots of stories in newspapers around the country older men folks who, after not riding in decades—or ever—bought a motorcycle, took delivery, and immediately crashed it. Moreover, stories abound about young men riding like madmen and getting themselves killed. Lack of proper training is a contributing cause to many motorcycle accidents.
Maybe you already know everything there is about riding a motorcycle. So take the Basic Rider Course anyway: it will be an easy review.
Please read “Unskilled and Unaware of It: How Difficulties in Recognizing One’s Own Incompetence Lead to Inflated Self-Assessments.”
What’s the best way to learn to ride a motorcycle?
In the US, the best way is to take the Motorcycle Safety Foundation’s Basic Rider Course.
In California: The California Motorcyclist Safety Program Basic Rider Course required if you are not yet 21 years old. If you pass the test at the end of the course, you get a certificate that you take to the DMV. This lets you skip the DMV’s riding test.
Where can I find an MSF course near me?
In California, call (877) RIDE-411 for the times and locations of classes near you. (800-CC-RIDER is obsolete!) In the United States, check out the moto-directory web site’s list of MSF Courses by State. In the rest of the world, check out their list of Motorcycle Riding Courses by Country.
How do I get my motorcycle driver’s license?
In the US, go to the DMV and take the motorcycle written and riding tests.
I’m coming back to riding after an absence of twenty years. I know how to ride. Why should I take a rider training course?
If you were a small-airplane pilot, would you expect the FAA to let you fly again after an absence like that without a refresher course?
Does insurance cover track schools?
Sometimes.
“Where did the accident happen?”
“I was attending a rider safety school called dP Safety School, on a closed course.”
“Closed course?”
“Yes. They rent out SIR and hold their riding instruction there. There is no traffic, no cars, no objects in the road, so it is pretty much the only safe place to hold these things.”
“You mean this was at a racetrack.”
“Yes it was. However, this was not racing. I was not in a speed contest. I was attending a course designed to make me a safer motorcyclist, on a closed course, under the supervision of experienced instructors.”
Don’t laugh—it has worked. You just have to be firm and make sure they understand it wasn’t a speed contest and you were not in a race with anyone, sanctioned or unsanctioned. —Jenner
 
Home http://www.timberwoof.com/motorcycle/faq/training.html, updated 20030720