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Legal Issues
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What motorcycle licenses are required?
In most states and countries, you need a separate license to operate a motorcycle.
What is the California DMV motorcycle riding test?
California Motorcycle License Skills Test (pdf) Photographs on Squidbait's site: Off-Axis, Start, Loop 1, Loop 2, Back
 
 
Do I need insurance?
The law thinks so, and anybody you injure or whose things you break in an accident might think so.
How much does insurance cost?
The younger you are and the sportier your bike is, the more more more it will cost. For some combinations, insurance will cost about the same as the loan payments.
What’s the California law on…?
You can look it up on line.
What’s my state’s law on…?
You can look that up on line, too.
Can I ride in car pool lanes?
In the United States, Yes. Unless the lanes are marked “Buses Only” or “Closed,” motorcycles are allowed in high-occupancy vehicle lanes, even if there are no signs saying “Motorcycles OK.”
Is lanesplitting legal?
In California, it’s not exactly illegal: From the CHP web site 8/16/2000: “Lane splitting by motorcycles is permissible under California law but must done in a safe and prudent manner. The motorcycle should be traveling no more than 10 mph faster than surrounding traffic (without exceeding the speed limit) and not come close enough to that traffic to cause a collision.” However, that wording was changed by 10/18/2000 to read “Lane splitting by motorcycles is permissible but must be done in a safe and prudent manner.”
In most other states it’s illegal.
What are the traffic laws in other places?
Looking at a “Unified” Europe
European International Road Signs And Conventions
How can I safely offer a test ride when selling a used motorcycle?
In the sales contract, give the buyer the right to return the motorcycle in its original condition within one hour of the sale. If the buyer likes it after the "test ride" he can take off on it and never see you again. All you have to do is sign the title and send it to the DMV. If the buyer brings it back, you inspect the bike and if everything is okay, give back the money.
Do not accept some other vehicle as collateral. What will you do with someone else's $1k truck?
Do not accept some small cash "deposit."
If your motorcycle is a good bike for a beginner, then expect a beginner to buy it.
If this is going to the buyer's his first bike, he should have a friend who is an experienced rider to do the test riding. Make sure the buyer or his friend has a license with a motorcycle endorsement as well as full riding gear.
If you think the buyer is a squid who's going to kill himself with your old motorcycle, you have the right to refuse to sell it to him.
If you think the buyer is a hoodlum and his buddies in the truck are shady-looking, tell him to go home.
Any more resources?
Moto-Rama's Legal Links page.
 
Home http://www.timberwoof.com/motorcycle/faq/legal.html, updated 20070906